6/1 Weightloss Wednesday: 38 Lbs Down!

6/1 Weightloss Wednesday: 38 Lbs Down!

It’s Weightloss Wednesday!  I’m thrilled to say that I am down to 262 lbs which means I have lost 4.6 lbs for the week, 38 lbs for the year and 138 from when I was at my heaviest.  This is all fantastic news and I can’t tell you how exciting it is to get on the scale and see those numbers get lower and lower.  Of course the best part is that I’m not starving myself, I eat what I want as long as it isn’t a sugar, grain, or starch.  As long as I don’t eat anything that causes my blood sugar to rise, the weight comes off!

Exercise has been a challenge because the weather down here in Texas has been either ridiculously hot or we are in the middle of torrential downpours, sometimes both those things are happening at the same time.  It has made me realize that I should probably invest in some indoor exercise equipment.

Thanks to those of you that have joined us for the 28 Day Weight Loss Challenge as that has made a huge difference in my focus,

Please remember to subscribe to the YouTube channel to never miss a video or follow @MySugarFreeJrny on Instagram.  Thanks!

 

 

Keto Friendly Lemon Fat Bomb Recipe!

Keto Friendly Lemon Fat Bomb Recipe!

Since we cut the sugar out of our lives a few years ago, desserts have become fairly unimportant.  Which if you knew me back when I could inhale a pint of Ben & Jerry’s a night, you would know what an incredible statement that is.  Not only to my resolve to lose this weight but also to the power of the Low Carb, High Fat lifestyle.  But every once in a while, you like to have a little something sweet to finish off a meal and if I can make that sweet also be full of fat, so much the better.

So last night I started messing around and made some incredible tasty lemon and chocolate fat bombs that turned out to be very rich and just sweet enough to satisfy a craving.

If you try this for yourself, I would love to see it!  Just tag @MySugarFreeJrny on Instagram and I will check it out.  Thanks!

 

5.0 from 1 reviews
Keto Friendly Lemon Fat Bomb
Author: 
Recipe type: Dessert
Cuisine: Keto
Prep time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 6 servings
 
A Full Fat Keto Friendly Dessert
Ingredients
  • ¼ Cup Coconut Oil
  • 4 Tbsp Butter
  • 4 oz Cream Cheese
  • 2 Tsp Lemon Juice
  • 2 Tsp Sugar Substitute
Instructions
  1. Place all ingredients in mixing bowl and mix thoroughly
  2. Spoon about 2 Tbsp into cupcake holders and freeze

Need more info about the ketogenic diet? How about a great support group? Join our Ketogenic Facebook support group!

Day 8: Where Do Fat Cells Come From?

Day 8: Where Do Fat Cells Come From?

Over the course of our 28 Day Weight Loss Challenge our Daily Recap videos  will be where I post the notes I have written for the talks I do in the FaceBook Group each night.  Hopefully this will make what we are talking about easier to follow for everyone that wants to join us in the challenge.  You can see each of the 28 Day Challenge recap posts here.  Please subscribe to the YouTube channel to never miss an video.

Where do fat cells come from, how are they filled and how do you empty them.  These are the big questions science is trying to answer.  One thing we are pretty sure of is that the number of fat cells you have is determined at birth which is a good thing.  Your fat acts as a cushion for your internal organs during birth and keeps you warm so you aren’t at the mercy of the elements.   For most of human history, fat was a great thing and the more you had the better your survival chances.  It’s only in the last 50 years or so that obesity has become the epidemic it is.

The number of fat cells is determined by 4 factors

  1. Genetics – There is obviously a genetic factor in obesity but genes don’t change fast enough to explain the obesity epidemic that has happened in the last 50 years.
  2. Epigenetics – These are changes around the genes but not to the genes themselves.  Epigenetic factors can suppress healthy gene function and can be also be passed on from parents to child.
  3. Developmental programming – These are factors that affect the baby in the womb.  If the mother is undernourished or develops gestational diabetes, the baby will develop increased insulin sensitivity in order to gain weight as a survival mechanism.  Babies that are born with low birth weights are at increased risk of obesity later in life as the hormones work to pack on the pounds to increase the survival chances.
  4. Environmental Toxins – There hasn’t been as much work done in this area but it seems as though there are toxins we can be exposed to in utero that increase the rate of fetal adipose tissue.

So if you have been fat your entire life, there is every reason to believe it wasn’t your fault but there is hope.

So your number of fat cells is determined at birth, how are they filled?  This is the million dollar question.  We’ve all seen reports that blame everything from lack of school recess to FaceBook being blamed for obesity but obesity begins and ends with insulin.  Control your insulin and you control your weight.

There are 3 ways to increase your insulin.

  1. Eat a meal, particularly one high in sugar and/or carbohydrates.  This makes your pancreas secrete insulin to deal with the increased blood sugar
  2. If you have built up fat around your liver, your pancreas will have to make more insulin than normal to overcome the increased insulin resistance in your liver.
  3. Be stressed out.  Stress makes the hormone Cortisol, which makes your liver and muscles more insulin resistant.  It may also work on your brain to make you eat more.

Once a glucose molecule is in the bloodstream, you will either have to burn it through exercise, store it as fat, or pass it out through urine which will eventually destroy your kidneys.

All notes taken from information found in Fat Chance by Dr Lustig, Good Calories, Bad Calories by Gary Taubes, The Angriest Trainer Podcast and Jimmy Moore’s Podcasts.

Day 8: Where Do Fat Cells Come From?

Day 7: How Stress Causes Weight Gain

Day 7: How Stress Causes Weight Gain

Over the course of our 28 Day Weight Loss Challenge our Daily Recap videos  will be where I post the notes I have written for the talks I do in the FaceBook Group each night.  Hopefully this will make what we are talking about easier to follow for everyone that wants to join us in the challenge.  You can see each of the 28 Day Challenge recap posts here.  Please subscribe to the YouTube channel to never miss an video.

 

Stress also has an effect on weight gain.  Science tells us that if you put animals or people in stressful circumstances, they will often eat even if they aren’t hungry.  Have you ever had a stressful day and just wanted to unwind with a pint of Haagen Dazs?  Why is that?

Right on top of your kidneys sits you adrenal glands.  The job of your adrenal glands is to secrete the hormone Cortisol.  Cortisol is your body’s response to stress.  It is cortisol that keeps you from going into shock when you dehydrate, keeps you awake when you are fatigued but in a stressful situation, and reduces inflammation.  Cortisol is supposed to spike when you are in a dangerous situation like being chased by a bear or getting cut off in traffic, and then slowly subside.

But what if you are always under stress?  If you are one of the countless Americans that live paycheck to paycheck and aren’t confident where your next meal is coming from then those adrenal glands are constantly pumping out cortisol.  Cortisol increases blood pressure, increases blood glucose levels and increases heart rate.  Cortisol also increases the desire for “comfort food” and packs on fat around your midsection.

We know that it is the poorest sections of people in America that have the most stress and suffer most from cortisol overload.  Risk factors for this cortisol problem is being poor,  being female, being a minority, and having very little confidence or authority.  Children have these stressors as well and if your body conditions you to seek comfort in sugary foods when you are young, that’s a hard habit to break as you get older.

Cortisol not only triggers craving for comfort foods, but it seems to trigger those cravings primarily at night.  This is why you need that late night dessert or snack before going to bed.  And these so called “stress eaters” exhibit increases in insulin, weight and cortisol at night.

Stress also decreases your sleep time and BMI increases among people who get less sleep.  Sleep deprivation increases cortisol and leptin which mimics starvation and hunger.  It also activates the hormone ghrelin which makes you desire food.  A high BMI is a strong predictor of sleep deprivation due to sleep apnea.  Both my wife and I used to be horrible snorers until we lost about 100 lbs each, now we don’t snore at all.

So insulin and cortisol work together to drive weight gain.  Insulin essentially tells your body to store fat and cortisol tells your body where to put it.  They do different things but work together to make you fatter.

So these three things, hunger, reward and stress, conspire together to drive high levels of insulin and weight gain.  The high levels of insulin suppress leptin so you always feel hungry and don’t want to move or expend energy. It also makes you crave high-fat and high sugar foods as a reward.  Stress releases cortisol which promotes excessive food intake.  Taken together, it’s a hormonal trap that is difficult to get out of.

All notes taken from information found in Fat Chance by Dr Lustig, Good Calories, Bad Calories by Gary Taubes, The Angriest Trainer Podcast and Jimmy Moore’s Podcasts.

Day 7: How Stress Causes Weight Gain

Day 6: Why is Fast Food so Addictive?

Day 6: Why is Fast Food so Addictive?

Over the course of our 28 Day Weight Loss Challenge our Daily Recap videos  will be where I post the notes I have written for the talks I do in the FaceBook Group each night.  Hopefully this will make what we are talking about easier to follow for everyone that wants to join us in the challenge.  You can see each of the 28 Day Challenge recap posts here.  Please subscribe to the YouTube channel to never miss an video.

So what makes fast food addictive? A Big Mac with large fries and a large soda contains 1360 calories or two thirds of the recommended total caloric intake for the day.   It contains 1380 milligrams of sodium, or almost an entire day’s allotment.  The fat content is 38% of the total calories and the sugar content is 95 grams, or 19 teaspoons, or 390 calories.  More than the American Heart Association recommends you eat in one day.  50% of Americans are eating this or the equivalent at least once a week.

So what part of this meal is so addictive?  Let’s take a look at the macro nutrients and figure out if they are addictive

Salt

Our example meal contains 1380 milligrams of sodium.  The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans sets the upper limit of allowable sodium per day at 2300 mg so if you eat this, you are already at half of all the sodium you should eat if you are comfortable with the “upper limit”.   Processed food adds about 3400 mg of sodium to the diet of the average American every day, but is it addictive?  We know a taste for salt is acquired over time, usually at about four to six months old.  We also know people can change their salt preferences fairly easily.  For instance, people with high blood pressure that have to cut back on salt usually report that it takes about 12 weeks on a low sodium diet to begin to prefer the low sodium food.  So salt is not typically an addictive substance.

Fat

The high fat content in fast food is what makes it so rewarding.  In animal studies, rats will binge on fat if given the chance but will not show the other signs of addiction like withdrawal or tolerance.  The issue here is fat is almost always found in fast food that is also high in starch like pizza, or high in sugar like cookies.  Adding sugar significantly increases the preference for high fat foods in normal weight people.  So fat can be addictive when mixed with sugar.

Caffeine

Drinking a large soda with your meal will net you about 58 mg of caffeine.  Caffeine has been proven to be very addictive with 30% of Americans feeling intense withdrawal symptoms if the don’t have their morning coffee.  Children will usually get their caffeine fix from soda and feel the same withdrawal symptoms if they don’t have a soft drink with their meals.

Sugar

Now we get to the real culprit.  Sugar has been proven in animal trials to be extremely addictive.   Given unlimited access to sugar, rats will bings.  They will show signs of withdrawal when you take it away.  They will show seeking and craving behavior if you take sugar away from them. Over-consumption increases with time, which means a growing tolerance for sugar.  Did you know almost every item on the McDonald’s menu has added sugar?  Right now the only things on the menu without added sugar are french fries, hashbrowns, sausage, chicken nuggets without sauce, coffee, iced tea and diet soda.  Everything else on the menu has contains sugar.  Why?  Because they want you addicted!

We probably developed our sweet tooth because no sweet foods in nature are acutely poisonous.  If it was sweet, it was good to eat!  So we naturally gravitated toward eating sweet foods.  I can tell you from my own experience with 4 kids and 4 grandkids that getting a baby to eat peas is tough, but throw a banana on their plate and they can’t scarf it down fast enough.

All notes taken from information found in Fat Chance by Dr Lustig, Good Calories, Bad Calories by Gary Taubes, The Angriest Trainer Podcast and Jimmy Moore’s Podcasts.

Day 6: Why is Fast Food so Addictive?